Veterinarians And The ‘Duty To Report’

31642869_l

Our fight for the horses would be quickly accomplished if there were more veterinarians, farriers and trainers who would stand their ground and speak out.  We need a united front of professionals whose clients are the horses.

Very good analysis from Faunalytics – please also read  the study – Breaking the Silence – the Veterinarian’s Duty to Report by Martine Lachance, Professor,  Department of Juridical Sciences, Université de Québec à Montreal.

“When it comes to the safety and security of companion animals, veterinarians obviously play a crucial role. They are who we turn to when our companions are sick or otherwise need medical attention. In some cases, veterinarians may notice things about the human-animal relationship that is troubling or indicates abuse. While it is common to say that animals can’t speak for themselves, veterinarians may be able to identify abuse or neglect over the course of regular checkups or other procedures. Medical, legal, and other such professions often have a code of professional confidentiality in place that is meant to foster trust with patients, but in the case of veterinarians, this code of confidentiality may be more of a curse than a blessing.

This paper examines the code of professional confidentiality in the veterinary field and discusses how that code may not apply in the same ways because veterinarians have dual clients — the animals and their guardians. This tension between animal welfare and professional secrecy is largely due to the need to “minimize needless animal suffering” and to “provide full legal protection to the client-practitioner relationship,” respectively. What happens, though, if veterinarians notice something where the client-practitioner relationship needs to be set aside to protect the interests of the animal? In this sense, veterinarians are often the first line of defence for animals as they are the first people who are in a position to detect abuse. And so, we arrive at two important questions:

“Is a practitioner morally justified to report suspected cases of abuse to the appropriate authorities? If so, is the professional legally authorized to report the case even when bound by the rule of professional secrecy?”

While the answers may seem simple to animal advocates, the implications for veterinary practice could be profound. The right to professional secrecy is considered by many to be a “fundamental right” and an essential component of the medical legal framework. Still, this does not mean there aren’t exceptions, even in the human world. The field of pediatrics has long recognized the importance of putting in provisions where a doctor has a “duty to report” in situations of neglect or abuse of a child.

Some states in the U.S. (North Carolina, Georgia, Maine, Maryland, New York, and Oregon) have laws stating that veterinarians have a “moral obligation” (which is not the same as a legal obligation) to “report suspicious cases of mistreatment” of animals. In Canada, only Ontario has provisions for this, though they are also voluntary. With mandatory reporting, it may “appear to resolve the ethical dilemma of the practitioner,” but enforcing this mandatory reporting is also difficult. Practitioners may feel that they have a duty of conscience to report, but not a legal duty.

What’s more, the failure to report abuse often “does not expose professionals to any disciplinary consequences: any resulting professional penalties, being neither physical nor monetary, do not seem to carry the same weight as legal penalties.” While the legal duty to report abuse is currently in place in eight U.S. states (Arizona, California, Colorado, Illinois, Kansas, Minnesota, Oklahoma, and West Virginia) and two provinces (Newfoundland/Labrador and Quebec), “the actual exercise of the duty to report occurs almost as infrequently in the United States as the actual exercise of the right to report under voluntary disclosure.”

Where does this leave companion animal advocates and, more importantly, companion animals? The author doesn’t have solutions, per se, as creating provisions for the duty to report and enforcing those provisions are both very difficult legal tasks. The author does put forth the hope that codes of silence around reporting animal abuse can be broken down and that, as societies around the world become more attuned to the suffering of animals, we will see increasing importance placed on the duty to report. Professional veterinary associations, the author notes, may have an especially important role to play, to “help practitioners gain a better understanding of animal cruelty, the legal rules of disclosure, and the most appropriate response in such cases.” For animal advocates, this article gives a great deal to think about how we might also do our part in raising awareness of these issues.”

Veterinarians Need To Earn Respect By Rediscovering Original Mission

12992387_mlHere is a compelling article on the true value and merits of an animal-centric veterinary practice – from India, of all places.  We wish that North American veterinarians would read this and take this to heart.

Originally sourced here:

By Maneka Gandhi

“Once a week I get an application from people who want to join my hospital/shelter as a veterinary doctor. They come without experience and completely raw, unable to diagnose anything. After several months of training, one fine day, the vet will simply vanish — usually it’s the day after he gets his salary. Or he will say his mother is sick and take leave for a few days, never to return. Investigations reveal he has been chosen for a government job.

What do they do in the government? Do they heal animals? Do they go into the villages and teach villagers how to look after their animals? No. The ones that are unlucky enough to be posted to mofussil district clinics, while away their time playing cards or sitting in the winter sun. Those that are posted to city desk jobs become clerks and go into becoming teachers in government veterinary colleges. They have to look after the stray animals on the road and those that are taken to kanji houses. Not one of them does that and the kanji houses are simply a place where confiscated cattle are sold to butchers at night. Those that go to government laboratories to look after the “animal houses” – the animals that are used for experimentation – hardly ever go to work since their only job is to supply the poor animal to the experimenter. No one asks them how many die and whether they die of experimentation or starvation. The most prized posting that all government vets want is to slaughterhouses. Under the law every slaughterhouse has to have one vet for 96 animals. In reality, the slaughterhouses including the government ones in the capital, kill thousands of animals illegally. No vet can check the health of hundreds of animals with a cursory look. They have worms, broken limbs, tuberculosis, brucellosis, leukosis, sores, many are pregnant, most of them are underaged, and most of them are deeply wounded from being overloaded onto trucks and have gangrenous limbs. Many cannot walk and are dragged by the tails to the place of slaughter; breaking the rules that no sick animals can be killed. No vet checks any of this– most of them stay at home and receive a weekly packet from the butchers to stay away. In the history of slaughterhouses in India, not a single vet has rejected an animal for slaughter.

Another lucrative way is to certify private meat export companies without checking the meat. Many meat companies have been raided. What has been found is hundreds of pre-signed forms for years ahead in which the government vet has written that he has checked the meat and it is the meat of a buffalo, healthy, fresh and conforming to the rules. The meat has been found to be of cows and bulls. The vet gets paid per form without even being in the same city. A meat export company in Kanpur has its head office in Delhi – a small locked room that is the official “registered office”. Why do they keep it? They keep it so that the Delhi vet can sign for the Kanpur consignments.

The Supreme Court ordered an inspection of all slaughterhouses. By law, abattoir vets have to be on site to check that animals arriving and being unloaded are in a fit state to be slaughtered. They are also required check how animals are handled before slaughter. The other part of their job is leading a team of meat inspectors who monitor cleanliness and the processing of carcasses to control risks to health and hygiene. The inspections showed no vets on the premises and every kind of barbaric, terrible form of killing was common. Their excuse is they are threatened with knives by dangerous and volatile slaughterers if they object to anything. After a few days vets become immune to being surrounded by death, noise, shit and concrete, blood and screams.

Does this only happen in India? No. Across the world, the nature of the vet has changed. Very few are interested in animal welfare or health. Most now see animals as a route to a lot of money. A growing number opt to work in factory farms, poultries, and piggeries. They work in dimly lit, smelly, overcrowded sheds to prop up the factory farming system. Their aim is to keep animals alive long enough to be slaughtered profitably or to ensure they keep churning out enough milk or eggs to be commercially viable.

Instead of contributing to the development of sustainable, healthy farming systems, they have become servants of the industrial farming machine. They are the technicians that are called in to patch things up and keep the system going. They cannot afford to upset their bosses by accusing them of institutional cruelty. So they support a system that is inherently bad for animal welfare. They support the mass production of broiler chickens, caged production of eggs, the large-scale permanent housing and artificial insemination of dairy cows and highly intensive pig production where mother pigs are kept in confinement where they can’t turn around for weeks. Vets no longer see animals as their clients; they see the person who signs their salary check.

Where they are at their worst is the use of antibiotics. Seventy percent of the world’s antibiotics are fed to farm factory animals and it is vets who prescribe the medicines. Instead of demanding a different agricultural system where animals roam free and eat natural, they are complicit in the cramming of animals into a small space causing disease. Antibiotics are used prophylactically to tackle the disease and keep the animal alive and growing.

All over the world, and especially in India, vets support farming practices that inflict unnecessary suffering. The American Veterinary Association ignored the slaughter of lame cows for food, force feeding of geese for foie gras, starvation of hens to extend their laying cycle, or confining calves for veal, until the industries began to change on their own in response to public opinion. In fact, the AVMA has actively lobbied in favour of the mass use of antibiotics that allows farmers to cram livestock into small buildings, and vehemently opposed legislation to stop the slaughter of horses for human consumption, and bills that would outlaw all battery cages in poultries; one of the most cruel and inhumane practices in modern agriculture where hens are forced to live in a cage, smaller than a letter size sheet of paper, their entire life. Why? Because a cage free environment means less sickness and about “1500 vets would lose their jobs”.

The German government regularly fines vets for selling huge quantities of drugs and dispensing medications to animals which should never have been administered. Investigators with the public prosecutor’s office say that veterinary clinics are essentially a mail-order operation for drugs, and that the pharmaceutical industry expresses its gratitude with giving the vets money and perks. In India the pharmaceutical industry does the same with our vets. When a veterinarian finds a sick chick among 20,000 other chicks, he treats the discovery as justification to preventively treat the entire flock with antibiotics. Flock or herd health monitoring is the code name for the generous administration of drugs. In many cases fake diagnoses are used to provide a justification for the use of antibiotics. Veterinarians are allowed to both prescribe and sell medications — with no supervision whatsoever. After testing 182 flocks on commercial chicken farms, German authorities found that over 90 percent of the animals were being fed a constant diet of drugs, raising suspicions that the drugs were being used to fatten poultry rather than to fight disease. 900 tons of antibiotics were fed to animals in Germany in 2010; 116 tons more than in 2005 and three times more than the entire German population takes annually. India uses even more. The mass dosing of intensely-confined animals on factory farms with antibiotics by vets is linked with the growth of dangerous antibiotic-resistant bacteria known as “superbugs.” This overuse of antibiotics also allows animal cruelty — cramming animals into dark, filthy, crowded spaces on factory farms — to continue.

We need vets to rediscover their original mission; animal welfare. Vets have the power to change the system for good. It’s hard to understand why medical professionals, who specialize in treating animals, actively contribute to their pain and terror. Vets in India command no respect. They need to earn it by stopping their immoral practices that are killing both animals and people.”

Progressive Pet Simulation-Based Veterinary Learning Paradigms Expand

Pferde-Gyn-Simulator
Researchers at the University of Veterinary Medicine in Vienna have shown that simulator-based training can be extremely efficient to achieve learning outcomes in veterinary gynaecology.

What began with the world’s first robotic rescue dog for medical training is evolving into a new teaching paradigm in veterinary medicine.  Simulator-based training of students at Vetmeduni Vienna has been part of the curriculum since 2012. The Skills Lab is a simulated veterinary practice in which students have the chance to train in a variety of veterinary interventions in a near-realistic setup on animal dummies.

Simulations like this have been used to teach human doctors for decades. The idea is to bridge pre-clinical learning and actual clinical experience, letting students practice applying what they’ve learned in a safe setting before the stakes get high.

A study of the effectiveness of the simulator was based on recordings of the students’ heart rate and salivary cortisol concentration during the training sessions and tests. The results of that work were published recently in the scientific journal, Reproduction in Domestic Animals.

The results from these studies are encouraging and progressive,  and we hope that the curriculum will be adopted by other institutions.

Another topic we hope will be covered more progressively with veterinary students is the issue of horse slaughter.  Far too often we hear from veterinarians who are unfamiliar with food safety standards,  the inhumanity of transport,  and drug prohibitions in horses sent to slaughter.  Instead,  many equine veterinarians often let their clients’ opinion and prejudice determine whether they take a public stance on slaughter.  Respect and integrity shape the public perception of veterinarians – please know that in Canada,  64% of Canadians polled are opposed to horse slaughter.

Veterinary Viewpoints: Twelve Days Of Christmas For Your Horse

 

happy holidays snow globeWritten

On the first day of Christmas, give your horse your attention. Whether it is a good brushing or just a scratch in the ‘oh so favorite’ spot, your beloved friend will appreciate your time.

On the second day of Christmas, give your horse a safe barn and pasture. Check electrical wiring in the barn. Look for loose boards, nails and screw eyes that can be a source of injury. Check fencing for loose boards, posts and wires. Make sure all feed storage containers are clean and secure. Clever horses and ponies can open and unlatch doors and containers. Check your fire extinguisher. While you’re at it, check the trailer and the hitch on your vehicle.

On the third day of Christmas, schedule a visit with your veterinarian for a health checkup and suggestions for maintaining the well-being of your horse. While you’re at it, visit your physician for your own health checkup to be sure the entire family is healthy.

On the fourth day of Christmas, make your horse a warm mash. Some folks like to use wheat bran; however, rolled oats or beet pulp can also make a good base. Carrots, molasses, apples and applesauce make flavorful additions.

On the fifth day of Christmas, talk with your veterinarian about your parasite control program. Your veterinarian may recommend a fecal exam to determine the parasite load in your horse.

On the sixth day of Christmas, visit an equine therapy organization. We already know that horses are good for people. Find out what you can do to support your local organizations.

On the seventh day of Christmas, create an emergency response plan for your horses. Because of their size and specific transportation needs, horses require extra consideration for disasters. Consider your options for identification such as a tattoo, microchip, brand or bridle tags. Visit the AAEP website for Emergency Disaster and Preparedness Guidelines.*

On the eighth day of Christmas, visit the University of Guelph website for a bio security assessment of your facility. This tool provides information on equine health, infectious disease and infectious disease control.

On the ninth day of Christmas, buy your horse a ball. Many horses will amuse themselves in the stall or pasture with a ball. Some horses prefer the ones with a handle.

On the 10th day of Christmas, get your horse a slow feeder for grain or hay. The slow feeder makes mealtime more stimulating. Slow feeding keeps the horse amused for longer periods of time and encourages healthy digestion. Many ideas are available on the Internet for homemade slow feeders.

On the 11th day of Christmas, wash that saddle pad or blanket. You may even need to replace the saddle pad or blanket. Remember the blanket or pad helps to protect the horse’s back, which is critical for their comfort.

On the 12th day of Christmas, go through your veterinary medicine cabinet and toss expired and contaminated medications. Using expired or contaminated medications can do more harm than good. If you like to keep a dose of pain relief on hand, check with your veterinarian for the best product for your needs.”

Veterinary Viewpoints is provided by the faculty of the OSU Veterinary Medical Hospital. Certified by the American Animal Hospital Association, the hospital is open to the public providing routine and specialized care for all species and 24-hour emergency care, 365 days a year.

CVEWC wishes to inform our readership that the AAEP mentioned in Dr. Geidt’s post,  does not  oppose horse slaughter. We suggest two good alternative Canadian sites for disaster preparedness are the Canadian Disaster Animal Response Team  and Pet Safe Coalition of Canada Society.

W5 Exposé Reveals Lack of Independent Scientific Wildlife Management Plan For Wild Horses

Robert Keith Spaith Sculpture
Breakaway bronze statue of wild horses by Robert Keith Spaith in Calgary International Airport terminal

In the first of a two part exposé by investigative journalists from W5,  it was revealed that Alberta’s previous Progressive Conservative government did not commission its own studies of wild horse populations,  preferring instead to take ranchers’ analysis at face-value.  When independent wildlife biologists and animal advocates sought to review that evidence through freedom-of-information requests, the government and ranchers’ association denied access.

In studies that have suggested that there is damage to grasslands,  these findings were observed in areas where access is shared by both horses and cattle,  which are being grazed in orders of magnitude over that of horses in Alberta.

From the W5 article “Born Free”:

“There are now, by the government’s admittedly limited count, around 700 left to roam free in the province, 200 fewer than this time last year. A tough winter and the occasional predator took most of them, while government-licensed trappers took 50. Some of those were sent to a no-kill auction in Innisfail. The government doesn’t know what happened to the rest, as it doesn’t track the horses’ well-being after they’re captured.

The capture and cull has been happening regularly in Alberta, almost every year as the number of wild horses fluctuates.

Ranchers, particularly in the Rocky Mountain foothills of Central Alberta, collect evidence they then turn over to the government, which they claim shows wild horses are over-eating the grazing grasslands needed for domesticated cattle. But the reports are not routinely released to the public……”

Letter: Canada Mired In A Graveyard Of Animal Ethics

Ken McLeod foal photo
Photo Credit: Ken McLeod

The following letter to the editor appeared in the online version of the Kelowna (British Columbia) Daily Courier on October 20th.  Letters such as these show that public awareness of the horse slaughter and food safety industries are being taken up on a mass scale….  Please read on and share.

“Industry without ethics, capitalism without conscience – is tortured flesh the flavour of our times?

The Canadian horse slaughter industry is an abomination.

Within its harrowing abyss exist: the theft of liberty, unpardonable anguish and the dismemberment of a noble icon.

Advocates in favour of this industry present the following arguments for its existence:

— Horses are meat.

— Slaughterhouses euthanize old, crippled and unwanted horses.

— Slaughter controls over population.

— The industry provides employment.

Different perceptions and the high ground we call morality oppose these arguments:

— Horses are not meat to do with as we please. Throughout history, beside the footprints of man are the hoofprints of the horse. A pony is a child’s dream, a horse an adult’s treasure. This industry, however, transforms treasures and dreams into nightmares of betrayal.

— Slaughterhouses do not humanely euthanize. They orchestrate terror and suffering. Over 90 per cent of their victims are young and healthy. Slaughter is not the answer to solve the aged, infirm, unwanted horse debate.

Rescue sanctuaries, veterans working with horses, responsible ownership, tourism co-ops, and ethical veterinarian care are a few viable solutions.

— The slaughter business perpetuates over-population and callous kill buyers and unscrupulous profit mongers love it.

— The industry does provide jobs, including: degrading kill-floor work and cash counting corporate accounting. However, we should use ingenuity to create jobs that save rather than ones that kill. The bottom line is this, an industry that is heartless and cruel, an industry without ethics, should be no industry at all.

Advocates for slaughter continue to define death at the slaughterhouses as humane euthanasia.

Rhetoric and covertness are cornerstones of their industry. The shipping of live draft horses to Japan so that their connoisseurs can enjoy freshly butchered horse sashimi is a national disgrace.

Transportation to, and imprisonment in, slaughterhouse corrals is an abusive, nefarious activity. And, the final stages of the process — kill chutes, stun boxes, captive bolts to the head and dismemberment (of, at times, live horses) far over-step boundaries of morality.

Our culture has never embraced the concept of horse meat for human consumption. We should not be part of the “Meat-Man’s Trade” that ships befouled flesh overseas. Our horse is not a commodity to be exploited. This intelligent beast helped First Nations people survive, stood beside — and died with — our soldiers on countless battlefields including the poppy-coated fields of Ypres and Flanders, transported pioneers westward, pulled our plows, helped build our railroads.

Horses have entertained us and joined us in recreational pursuits.

They are a beloved companion.

And, so often, they have provided hope and tranquillity to troubled souls. The horse is the single most influential animal to affect mankind.

There should be no place in our society for foreign-driven horse slaughter. Canadians need to stare this oppressive industry square in the face and declaim, “Not in our country.”

It is time to write federal politicians and demand action that terminates the atrocities, time to listen with our heart to the desperate call unspoken of our friend, the horse.

It is the horse slaughter industry not our ethics and our horses that should be in the graveyard.”

D. Fisher, Kelowna

Is Canada Poisoning The World?

horse-drugsThis letter was sent to us by a CVEWC supporter,  who had plans to submit it to newspapers.  We think it is an excellent assessment of Canada’s involvement in the discredited business of horse slaughter:

“Why, yes, we are. Every year Canada exports thousands of tons of horse meat to Europe and other world countries for human consumption. The latest report from StatsCan shows that in 2014 Canada exported 13 Million tons of horsemeat valued at $78,422.525 million to different countries around the world.

Europe, specifically France, Switzerland, Belgium are the leading importers. Japan is also high on the list importing a little over 3 Million tons in 2014. Canada also live ships draft horses from Calgary and Winnipeg to Japan for human consumption.

Europe and Japan appear to continue to ignore the fact that the majority of horse meat from Canada is contaminated with drugs banned in food animals destined for human consumption.

Horses in North America have never been considered a “food animal”. The US ceased slaughtering horses in 2007 and now export horses to Canada and Mexico for slaughter.

Most horses slaughtered here in Canada originate from US auctions. It’s a well-known fact that horses sold at auctions have virtually no traceability back to previous owners. Most horses will have had many owners over their lifetime with each owner likely giving the horse drugs banned by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and the EU.

These banned drugs include dewormers administered to horses about every 8 week or so as horses eat off of the ground and, subsequently, they always have worms. Worms in horses could be passed on to humans who eat the meat.

One type of illness from worms that can be passed on to horses is Trichinosis. The CFIA lists these as symptoms of Trichinosis:

Globally, outbreaks of human trichinellosis associated with pork from abattoirs operating under modern inspection systems rarely occur; however, cases which are associated with the consumption of undercooked meat from wild boars, horses, wildlife species such as walrus and bear, and outdoor-reared and home-processed swine continue to be reported.”

Further, the CFIA states on their web site:

“Clinical signs of trichinellosis in animals are not easily recognized.

The severity of human trichinellosis is dependent upon the number of infected larvae ingested, the species ofTrichinella, and the immune status of the human host. Commonly observed signs, which appear 5 to 15 days after exposure, may include:

  • abnormal fear of light;
  • facial swelling;
  • fever;
  • gastrointestinal upset;
  • headaches;
  • muscle pain; and
  • skin rash.

Inflammation of the heart muscle and the brain, if they occur, are serious and may be life-threatening.”

There have been documented cases in France and Argentina of Trichinosis infection.

Phenylbutazone is high on the list of banned medications but is given to horses as a common, inexpensive pain reliever. It’s also known as “bute”. Bute can cause aplastic anemia in children and cancer in adults. Because cancer can develop slowly, a person may not make the link to horse meat and their current battle with cancer whereas with Trichinosis signs can appear in 5 to 15 days after exposure.

The CFIA has a list of “Veterinary Drugs Not Permitted For Use in Equine Slaughtered for Food with Canadian Brand Name Examples” on their web site.

In their FAQs on the CFIA’s web site regarding horse slaughter one question is

Q7 Is Phenylbutazone is banned?

A7. The use of Phenylbutazone in equine for medical reasons is not currently banned in Canada. However; Phenylbutazone is not permitted to be used in equine animals that may be used for food.”

There are NO exceptions for bute in horses to be slaughtered for human consumption and horse owners continue to use it as horses in North America are not raised for meat.

The CFIA only requires that a horse be drug free for 180 days (6 months). They consider this a good withdrawal time for drugs given but as we’ve seen with dewormers they’re given usually every TWO months or so and bute has NO withdrawal time.

The only medical paperwork a horse bound for slaughter in Canada has is what’s called an Equine Identification Document. This piece of paper, yes, a single piece of paper has one question on it relating to drugs given to horses and that’s “has this horse had any banned drugs in the past 180 days”. That’s it. The EID is an honour system in a business that has no honour.

Created by the CFIA in 2010 who said at the time that   The EID is the first step in the development of a comprehensive food safety and traceability program for the Canadian equine industry – for both domestic and international markets.”

This has not been the case. The EID has proven to be a sham and there is no traceability program either in Canada or the US and the vast majority of horses going to slaughter here in Canada are from US auctions via what’s called kill buyers. These individuals who have contracts with the slaughter plants troll auctions and look for ads for free horses who they then sell to the slaughter plants for profit. The kill buyers do no tracing of a horse’s drug history at all.

The EID is supposed to be a truthful declaration as to what drugs the horse has had but when the kill buyer picks up a horse at an auction he has no idea what drugs the horse has had.   Kill buyers routinely lie on this document which becomes the property of the slaughter plant when the horse is killed and, so, cannot be publically releases under an Access to Information request.

Mark Markarian, who is chief program and policy officer for the Humane Society of the United States and president of The Fund for Animals, said recently that:

“There is currently no system in the US to track medications and veterinary treatments given to horses to ensure that their meat is safe for human consumption. It’s a free-for-all when this tainted and contaminated meat is dumped on unsuspecting consumers through their dinner plates and supermarket shelves, either overseas or here at home.”

The horses also endure very inhumane treatment until they are shot with either a .22 rifle or a captive bolt gun. There is much documentation available showing that both methods are equally cruel to horses.

The EU continues to ignore the failings of the EID system in Canada, however, in January 2015 the EU banned horse meat from Mexico because their audits of the Mexican slaughter plants revealed serious issues with the traceability of horses coming in from the US as well as horrendous cruelty in the Mexican slaughter pipeline.

Mexico had been audited in the past and were issued warning which they ignored.

Canadian slaughter plants including horse slaughter plants were audited by the EU in early 2014.

Many issues were found including traceability relating to drugs given to horses as well as operating practices that were not up to EU standards. Again, cruelty in the Canadian slaughter pipeline was noted by the EU. Traceability for horses being slaughtered in Canada is non-existent.

To date, the EU has failed to issue sanctions against Canada and the export of known contaminated drugged horse meat continues on unabated.

The Toronto Star’s Mary Ormsby has written several times about this issue with drugs in horse meat, the EU and the barbaric conditions in the slaughter pipeline.

The Canadian Horse Defence Coalition has been working for many years to ban the horse slaughter trade in Canada both on ethical and human health grounds but, still, the government continues to allow and even promote this business overseas.

As noted above the export dollars for Canadian horse meat shows that in 2014 the slaughter business only made a little over $73 Million with most of this going to auction houses, kill buyers and the slaughter plant operators.

What the government ignores is how much the live horse industry contributes to the Canadian economy. In 2010 Equine Canada did a study on the live horse industry in Canada. Their data revealed that “The total economic contribution to the Canadian economy from horses and activities with horses is $19 BILLION.” making this writer wonder why this current Canadian government spends time and money promoting horse slaughter.”

Veterinary Students From Across Canada Visit Alberta To Observe Wild Horses

Photo Credit:  Sandy Bell
Photo Credit: Sandy Bell

“An important aspect of the course is to strive towards taking a leadership role as a veterinarian in the local community, in pulling together community experts required to best address the question or problem at hand and to work towards a solution that is acceptable to as many stakeholders as possible.”

Bob Henderson, president of WHOAS, says, “It’s a valuable experience for the students to be able to come out here and witness the program, and be able to observe the wild horses to get a better understanding of all the issues that surround them.”

Read more here……

New Video Footage Released Showing Live Shipment of Horses at Quarantine Station in Kagoshima, Japan

dyk_yycAs a follow up to our August post on the live draft horse shipments out of Calgary, Alberta, new footage of the Kagoshima quarantine station in Japan is now being released.

This footage was taken in March 2015. In the first segment we see video of horses on a feedlot, followed by footage of horses being unloaded from crates after the long flight to Japan. These crates are smaller than the average horse stall and designed for three (but loaded with up to 4 horses) which is contrary to Canada’s Health of Animals regulations.

Petition Atlas Air to discontinue live shipments

At the quarantine station, the horses are unloaded to the concrete, bunker-like quarantine station where they will stay for a few weeks before being slaughtered. In the background you can hear Atlas Air taking off, no doubt to return with another shipment of horses on their next flight from YYC.

The Live Transport of 7,000 Draft Horses Annually To Japan

Every year, approximately 7,000 horses are transported by air from Calgary and Winnipeg (Canada) to Japan.  These shipments are often conducted weekly, with up to three to four large horses crammed together in wooden crates with little room to move around, let alone lie down to rest.  No food or water is provided during the gruelling journey to another continent.  Canadian legislation permits horses to be transported without food and water for up to 36 hours.  Sometimes, due to flight delays, the 36-hour period is breached.  During one year alone, six horses died during transport, three perished as a result of a landing accident, and one horse was found upside down and dead in his crate.  Upon arrival in Japan,  the horses are fed to much larger proportions often to the point of laminitis,  and then slaughtered.

Visualize if you will, how large the stall is in the average horse barn, built for the average-sized riding horse. Some are 10 x 10, others are 10 x 12, and so on. We are told that the crate size designed to contain THREE DRAFT HORSES is approximately 9.5ft by 7ft floor space by 7.6ft high. If you think that’s outrageous, imagine cramming FOUR DRAFT HORSES into the same space – a space already smaller than the average horse stall.  Loading three or four 1,500 – 1,700 lb horses in a 66.5 square foot crate does not meet the IATA international standards or Canada’s agreed-upon national standards. This is overcrowding and not compliant with the Health of Animals Regulations.

bdk11
This is the approximate size of the average horse stall. Now image a space SMALLER than this being used to transport up to 4 large draft horses with no food or water during that flight. In addition to the transport time, horses may be left for long periods on the tarmac subjected to engine noise, ground crews, and de-icing sprays while waiting to be loaded/unloaded.

Canadian legislation prohibits horses over 14 hands high to share a crate with other horses.  The law says they must be singly shipped.  Their heads must not touch the ceiling of the crate.  Horses must not be deprived of food and water for any longer than 36 hours.

The law says all of the above things.  But for reasons of profit, Canada ignores the law.

The carrier responsible for shipping these horses to their deaths is Atlas Air, Inc., based in Purchase, New York.

We invite you to politely request that Atlas Air stop shipments of live horses for slaughter.

Click Here for a link to the the petition

Links to supportive articles:

New footage of shipment of live draft horses arriving in Japan – https://canadianhorsedefencecoalition.wordpress.com/2015/07/12/never-before-released-video-footage-of-a-shipment-of-live-draft-horses-arriving-in-japan/

Footage from the Calgary, Canada airport from 2013 – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=04S9Qt_mH5Y

Draft horse hitting the top of crate with his head – https://vimeo.com/130818790

Debate on live horse shipment: https://canadianhorsedefencecoalition.wordpress.com/2015/07/16/debating-the-live-draft-horse-shipments-on-ctvs-alberta-primetime/

CHDC Issues Press Release – https://canadianhorsedefencecoalition.wordpress.com/2015/06/25/chdc-issues-press-release-regarding-violations-with-live-horse-shipments-to-japan/

CHDC files complaint with CFIA:  https://canadianhorsedefencecoalition.wordpress.com/2012/11/12/we-file-a-complaint-with-the-cfia-and-transport-canada-about-the-live-horse-shipments-to-japan/

CFIA Failure to Enforce Regulations: https://canadianhorsedefencecoalition.wordpress.com/2012/10/18/news-release-cfia-fails-again-at-enforcing-regulations-for-live-horse-exports-to-japan/